Free fireworks safety resources for the 4th

Looking for fireworks safety tips for your department to distribute? Be sure to check out NFPA’s Fireworks Safety section: In 2011, fireworks caused an estimated 17,800 reported fires, including 1,200 total structure fires, 400 vehicle fires, and 16,300 outside and other fires. These fires resulted in an estimated eight reported civilian deaths, 40 civilian injuries and $32 million in direct property damage. In 2012, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 8,700 people for fireworks related injuries; 55% of 2012 emergency room fireworks-related injuries were to the extremities and 31% were to the head. The risk of fireworks injury was…

How to eliminate LODDs in fire service training

By Sarah Calams For Fire Chief The International Association of Fire Chiefs and the National Volunteer Fire Council met Monday to take a close look at how to keep firefighters safe during training drills. This year’s International Fire and EMS Safety and Health Week theme is “train like you fight.” Fire departments are encouraged to focus on safety, health training and education during the week of June 15-21. An IAFC webinar presented by Allan Rice, of the Alabama Fire College and Personnel Standards Commission, and Assistant Fire Chief Jeffrey Segal, with the Baltimore City Fire Department, focused on how to eliminate line-of-duty…

Back to Basics: Engine company ops – master streams

By Mark van der Feyst For Firefighting In Canada The primary job function of an engine company is to suppress fire by using different-sized hoses and delivering water from its source to the fire. One such method of water delivery is master streams. Engine companies have a few options when it comes to master streams. Most engines have a fixed master stream device on top of the apparatus (see photo 1). This device is armed with either a straight-tip nozzle or a combination nozzle. The advantage of a straight tip is its reach when flowing water. A straight tip provides…

Firewise virtual workshop will help you understand how embers ignite roofs in a wildland fire

From NFPA Today Don’t miss out on your opportunity to “Ask the Expert” by participating in an upcoming virtual workshop on July 15th. The workshop will teach you about how embers ignite roofs in a wildland fire and how to make your roof more survivable. Join Firewise residents throughout the country through a one-hour format including a thirty minute presentation by Dr. Stephen Quarles, Ph.D. from IBHS, followed by a thirty minute live “Ask an Expert” interactive opportunity for pre-selected homeowners to ask a question related to the session’s topic. This unique learning format provides wildland/urban interface homeowners with information on…

Strategies for Protecting Firefighter Hearing

By Seth R. Nadel For FireRescue There is something dangerous that can be found at fire and rescue scenes that we often notice, but tend to ignore. Although it doesn’t present an immediate danger, it can have a negative impact on our health. But this danger is something we never talk about, perhaps because we no longer hear it. While we address the obvious dangers of flame, heat, toxic smoke, collapse, stress, falls, etc., we don’t seem to notice the impact of the one danger that we bring to the scene—noise. I’m sensitive to the issue, as I have had…

Fire Hero Learning Network launches operational checklists

From the Fire Hero Learning Network What are the NFFF Operational Checklists? The National Fallen Firefighters Operational Checklists project provides standard and customizable checklists for major operations conducted by fire departments. The checklists, developed by recognized experts and leaders in the fire service, detail the typical major tasks to be conducted during a particular type of operation. By using the checklists, you can help ensure that you have considered and completed all these tasks during the operation. Therefore, it is recommended that you print the checklists you create and keep a copy in each apparatus and response vehicle.

UL releases new research in basement fire computer modeling

From UL New Science Why Basement Fire Models Matter Basement fires are an extremely dangerous challenge for firefighters. In the late 1970s, fire deaths inside a structure occurred at a rate of 1.8 deaths per 100,000 structure fires. By the late 1990s, the mortality rate had risen to three per 100,000. Fire Engineering notes that a “large majority of firefighter fatalities or significant injuries occur at what were ultimately basement fires.” For these reasons, it is critical to understand the particular safety risks associated with basement fires through experimentation and advanced engineering analysis. To build on and further the knowledge…

Fire Engineering: Understanding and avoiding a flashover

By Michael Salzano For Fire Engineering The International Fire Service Training Association’s (IFSTA’s) Firefighter Essentials textbook defines a flashover as “the temperature in a compartment that results in the simultaneous ignition of all the combustible contents in the space.” However, I don’t care what the book says! Don’t get me wrong, “the book” helped teach us the initial essentials of firefighting—the tip of the proverbial iceberg—that is “enough to get you injured or killed.” However, the book won’t help you at 3 a.m. in a dark hallway with zero visibility and no visible fire. The only thing that will help you…

Into the Fire: Report examines fire that killed two Boston firefighters

By Michele McPhee For Boston Magazine The run came in at 2:43 p.m. on March 26, just as a dark cloud of smoke began to rise over the Back Bay. It was a nasty day—16 degrees and with gusts whipping off the Charles River at up to 50 miles per hour. A fire had started on Beacon Street near Exeter and now the wind was pushing the smoke across the neighborhood, darkening the area. About a half-mile away, the smoke was already visible from the Engine 33/Ladder 15 fire station on Boylston Street. In less gloomy weather, the doors to…

Trouble in Mind: Behavioral health in the fire service

By Janet A. Wilmoth For NFPA Journal KYLE IENN WAS ONE OF THE NEW BREED OF FIRE CHIEFS. A 23-year member of the fire service, he led a progressive volunteer fire department in his hometown of Ralston, Nebraska, a suburb of Omaha. He was active on the state and national level with the Nebraska Fire Chiefs Association and the International Association of Fire Chiefs’ Volunteer Combination Officers Section. He served the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation’s “Everyone Goes Home®” program, an initiative to prevent firefighter line-of-duty deaths and injuries. As founder of the Nebraska Serious Injury & Line of Duty Death…