The tightening of the belt – fire, police and EMS feeling the pinch

The days of public safety being spared cuts during difficult financial times appear to be over – and fire and police departments all over the United States are starting to feel the pinch. As tax revenues for municipalities decline, cities are tightening the belt on police, fire and emergency medical services. Read about some specific examples in this Wall Street Journal article and let us know what you think. Will cuts like these affect your department’s performance? Post a comment below and tell us what you think the impact will be to the general public if cities and municipalities continue to tighten the belt…

Why should I wear body armor?

By Ronald McBride, IACP/DuPont Kevlar Survivors’ Club — for LION Connects A compelling answer is contained in an FBI report of Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted. The report concludes: “Based on an in-depth analysis of situations and circumstances surrounding assaults on police officers, the risk of sustaining a fatal injury for officers who do not routinely wear body armor is 14 times greater than for officers who do.” Body armor is effective in protecting police officers from a variety of threats. Of the documented saves, nearly half involve threats other than ballistic. Two cases illustrate this point.

Selecting the right CBRN ensemble for the threat

HAZMAT teams aren’t the only ones to handle chemical/biological/radiological/nuclear (CBRN) incidents anymore. To protect yourself, you need to get informed — knowing which CBRN ensemble best meets the stresses of a CBRN  incident. Hot zone. This is the worst-case level: An immediate threat involving a substance of unidentified and unknown concentration Exposure to gas or vapor close to the point of release Victims are unconscious or dead Above Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) levels In these instances, your stay in the hazard zone with be short and you will have to breathe via the SCBA. The CRBN ensemble…